With The Irishman, Martin Scorsese has provided yet another late-period masterpiece following his immense acclaim and success with The Wolf of Wallstreet and Silence.

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Not every film in Martin Scorsese’s filmography is perfect. Some are uneven, some are weird, some are noble misfires, and some are barely holding together at the seams at times. These movies often serve to contrast the bold heights of his immense repetoir. That said, coming from a great director, even some of his second rate works are notable, culturally significant, enthralling, and brimming with something to say.

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Scorsese reached something of a career peak in the 1980s. During this period he wrote and directed some of his best and most interesting works. He started the decade with Raging Bull and filled it in with movies like The King of Comedy, After Hours, The Color of Money, and The Last Temptation of Christ. While the rest of Hollywood began its descent into Blockbuster-centric myopia, he stayed true to his guns and kept pushing himself. Then at the turn of the decade once again he returned with arguably the most iconic film in his filmography. 

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Following Raging Bull, Martin Scorsese underwent a total career revitalization. Suddenly he went from a has-been to the A-list of Hollywood with yet another Oscar-winning masterpiece under his belt. Once again, Robert De Niro started pushing Scorsese on yet another collaboration project given their previous incredible success. Once again Scorsese relented but in doing so it would give way to one of the most emotionally demanding films of his career: The King of Comedy. 

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